Monthly Archives: March 2012

O’Donnell talk this Thursday (15 March)

Announcing the fourth of five talks in the MARCS (Medieval and Renaissance Cultural Studies) Speakers’ Series:

Daniel Paul O’Donnell

(Department of English, University of Lethbridge)

“Move Over: Learning to Read (and Write) with Novel Technology” 

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Goodbye, Cruel Word: The Superiority of Scrivener

[Full disclosure: I took this title from Steven Poole‘s blog post of 2007; in 2009 Nick Balaz used the same title.]

These are my notes for a talk in the Faculty of Arts Research Seminar (FARS) series at the University of Calgary on March 14th, 2012. The convenors of FARS are me (Michael Ullyot) and Noreen Humble.

Descriptive Blurb

Scrivener is software (for Mac and Windows) designed especially for long, complex writing projects. Unlike many word processors, it accommodates writing at every stage, from gathering sources to outlining arguments to composing drafts to rearranging segments in a final text. It encourages you to dismember large projects into their constituent parts, to take notes and write sections in isolation or in context. It can compile those sections into an outline or display them as cards on a corkboard for you to stack and rearrange. Put simply, it elevates your words and simplifies your workflow; it is to word processors what fontina is to Velveeta.

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EEBO Tutorial: Books by printer + publisher

I wrote this tutorial, and another, for my English 411 (Seventeenth Century Literature) students to complete their EEBO Assignment, but both may be useful to others. The  instructions assume that you are logging in to Early English Books Online through your institution; mine is the University of Calgary Library.

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English 411: The EEBO Assignment

Introduction

Early English Books Online, or EEBO, “contains digital facsimile[s] … of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700.”  That’s a lot of books — something like 125,000 individual titles and editions.

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EEBO Tutorial: Searching

I wrote this tutorial, and another, for my English 411 (Seventeenth Century Literature) students to complete their EEBO Assignment, but both may be useful to others. The instructions assume that you are logging in to Early English Books Online through your institution; mine is the University of Calgary Library.

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