Foundations: Shakespeare | English 205, Winter 2015


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You’ve got mail: 172 messages, 48 unread

This screen is from the Pine e-mail client, a simple text-based email interface that I used in the mid-1990s, also known as the Internet’s ye olden days.

Travel with me now to an era of scarcity, when email was special. When I went to a special computer lab (no laptop) to use special text-language (no mouse) to log into a screen like this, where I’d linger over my two messages from that week, and tap out a reply with two fingers.

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Earning your Shakespeare badge

Second post in a series on the design & delivery of my intro-Shakespeare course next term. 

When you complete a degree, you earn a diploma. When you complete a course, you earn a grade on your transcript. Should this system of credentials translate to a more granular level, to particular goals within a course?

Imagine you meet a goal in my intro-to-Shakespeare course, say by publishing a couple of blog posts on the historical context or source-texts of Twelfth Night. Call it the “Context” badge. You’ve shown that you can read texts in relation to other texts – a skill that you can then transport to your next class, whether it be in History or English or Sociology or another discipline altogether.

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Begin with the End in Mind

The first in a series of posts on designing and delivering an introduction-to-Shakespeare course for 160 undergraduates, starting in January 2015. 

Course design is a rare pleasure and prerogative: the chance to set learning outcomes, align them with an assessment blueprint, and plan for various pathways to engage students. Know what I’m saying?

Okay, maybe that makes it sound pretty abstruse. That’s because I’ve utterly changed my course-design habits since becoming an Associate Dean. I take — even lead — workshops on how to align your goals with your grades, so I’ve reversed my process. Instead of browsing my shelves for texts I’d like to teach, I start by writing learning outcomes (which means this, or this). Then I work backwards to decide which texts will meet those outcomes.

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Teaching + Learning News 2.04

 End-of-Term Edition, 2014-12-12
Semi-regular reports on higher-education teaching and learning from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014. Follow me on Twitter, if you do that sort of thing. Feedback and submissions are always welcome. Leave a comment below, or drop me a line.
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Visitor surveillance, 365 days a year

In the interest of full disclosure, I should tell you that I know things about my site’s readers. Okay, let’s drop the passive voice: I know things about you, dear readers.

Like what? The Jetpack plugin — which I activated a year ago on this WordPress blog — tells me that I’ve had 9,923 page-visits in 12 months, and about 29 per day since the beginning of 2014. The numbers fluctuate wildly, peaking when I send out irregular Teaching + Learning newsletters to the Faculty of Arts list here at the University of Calgary.

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Starting a Co-op in the Faculty of Arts

Is your department or program in the Faculty of Arts thinking about starting a co-op program, practicum or internship? Here’s a handy step-by-step guide. (With thanks to Carllie Necker, Co-op Coordinator.)

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CFP: New Tech + Renaissance Studies @ RSA2016

A CFP for RSA 2016, 31 March – 2 April, Boston MA

Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America annual meetings have featured panels on the applications of new technology in scholarly research, publishing, and teaching sponsored by Iter. Panels at the 2016 meeting (31 March – 2 April, Boston) will continue to explore new and emerging projects and methodologies — this year also featuring virtual presentations and interactions at and in advance of the conference in Boston, in partnership with Iter Community.

We welcome proposals for papers, panels, and or poster / demonstration / workshop presentations on new technologies and their impact on research, teaching, publishing, and beyond, in the context of Renaissance Studies.  Examples of the many areas considered by members of our community can be found in the list of papers presented at the RSA since 2001 and in those papers published thus far under the heading of New Technologies and Renaissance Studies.

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Books I Own, But Have not Read: 1

This will come as a shock, no doubt: as an academic, I own some books that I have not read.

There, I said it. Admitting you have a problem, they say, is the first step to fixing it. But what if you have no intention or desire to fix it? What if it’s more a chronic condition than a problem?

My condition is that mix of bibliophilia and ambition that leads me to buy books to complete a set, fill out a series, extend an aesthetic line, and keep each other company. Sure, it’s object fetishism – but that’s justified easily enough. I tell myself that many of these books contain knowledge I might someday read, consult, cite, or peruse. Might is the operative, delusional word there – as if I have to own something to read it.

Let’s put aside the books that are part of my working library, the ones I use for teaching and research. Consider instead this specimen:

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Why Teaching Dossiers?

Why assemble a teaching dossier? The first time I ever heard of this document was when I was looking for an academic job right out of my Ph.D., nearly a decade ago – when the sum of my teaching experience was a series of Teaching Assistantships (Technical Writing, Survey of Major British Writers) and sessional-teaching appointments right. Job applications then, as now, asked for a teaching dossier to testify to your readiness to teach courses on day one of a new job, so I gathered up my syllabi and assignments, wrote a teaching philosophy statement, and sent it off.

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Speakeasies

Here are some more details about the Speakeasy series of informal student-faculty conversations and debates (as I mentioned in my last newsletter) in the Faculty of Arts, beginning next week. These are co-organized by me (Michael Ullyot) and Kalista Sherbaniuk, one of the four Students’ Union Arts Representatives.

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Second Annual RSA-TCP Article Prize

Cross-posted from the RSA site, where you can find more information. 

The Renaissance Society of America and the Text Creation Partnership (TCP) jointly offer a $600 article prize for scholarly uses of the range and depth of digitized Renaissance materials. The purpose of the prize is to encourage and reward scholarship that expressly emerges from the scholar’s use of databases or digitized research objects.

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Byword: Writing in Isolation

Like many people, I need simplicity and focus to do things well. Despite the crowded appearance of this blog, I write most of my posts in isolation, in both senses of the term: without interruptions (usually behind a closed door, and often with earplugs) and without too much thinking about the other posts I’ve written. Most of them are responding to ideas I’m encountering elsewhere (readings, conversations), but to get into that mental space I need an isolated work environment.

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Not an Advertorial

I read a lot of higher-education blogs, as Associate Dean for my faculty — and frankly, just as a curious and voracious reader. Sometimes I read a blog post that really resonates with me, because it provokes me to think differently about teaching and learning, about course materials and lectures and the things you can only do when you’re face-to-face in a classroom. (I’ve already written about face-to-face time here.)

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Teaching + Learning News 2.03

2014-10-28
Semi-regular reports on higher-education teaching and learning from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014. Follow me on Twitter, if you do that sort of thing. Feedback and submissions are always welcome. Leave a comment below, or drop me a line.
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The Book is maker of the Reader

“The Child is father of the Man,” William Wordsworth once wrote, counter-intuitively. What you experience in youth shapes your grown-up sensibility. My first post in this series on bookshelves was in that vein.

In the same way, the Book is maker of the Reader. Books change our minds, shift our perceptions, enlarge our imaginations. They enable readers to experience unfamiliar things, to see the world as if they had different circumstances. They enable us to empathize with other people more readily. Martha Nussbaum has said as much about the humanities in general.

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Digital Distractions in the Classroom

On Wednesday 29 October, from 11-12 p.m. in SS1339, the Faculty of Arts Teaching + Learning Committee will host a workshop on Digital Distractions in the Classroom, presented by Julie Sedivy from LLC (Linguistics, Languages and Cultures), who was recently the focus of a story in Swerve magazine on this subject. She’s published a book on the psychology of advertisements and she blogs for Psychology Today.

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Of Arranging Books there is no End

[First in a series of posts about books, shelves, and — wait for it — bookshelves. Walter Benjamin’s essay “Unpacking my Library” is a model of the form, and Anne Fadiman’s Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader is more recent.]

I got a stack of books for my ninth birthday. They were the types of books that kids read in the 1980s: Gordon Korman’s Macdonald Hall series; Roald Dahl’s Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar; Beverly Cleary’s Dear Mr. Henshaw. Three decades later, I remember that stack being about four feet high, but it was probably shorter. I took them to my room and arranged them, three separate times, on shelves: first by author, then by size, then by the order I would read them. I experimented with different shelving regimens everywhere in my room: alphabetically by author; by genre (science books here, Archie digests there); by size; and by series.

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Using Swivl for Lecture Capture

This is the first in a planned series of posts about planning + teaching my Intro-to-Shakespeare course next term, English 205 here at the University of Calgary.

A few weeks ago, I mused on Twitter about looking for a lecture-capture system — that is, a way to film my classes and post them online for students to review, or even (let’s be honest) to watch instead of coming to an 8 a.m. class.

Thanks to a suggestion from my friend Paul Schacht, I’ve settled on Swivl, a little robotic stand that swivels and turns to follow you, recording audio and video to your iPad, iPhone, or Android device.

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Research in 21st Century Libraries

I’m spending the day at this conference, chairing a panel on collaborative networks, video games for police training, and visualizations of a science fiction collection here at the University of Calgary. Earlier today, I captured this gallery of notes on considerations and themes when prototyping or launching digital research centres and visualization studios.

Teaching + Learning News 2.02


2014-09-25
Semi-regular reports on higher-education teaching and learning, as seen from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014. Follow me on Twitter, if you do that sort of thing.
Feedback and submissions are always welcome. Leave a comment below, or drop me a line.
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Call for ASHA Instructors

Call for Instructors, 2015-2016 & 2016-2017, Arts & Science Honours Academy (AHSA)

The Arts & Science Honours Academy (ASHA) is an interdisciplinary program for high-achieving undergraduates (30 per year) in both the Faculties of Arts and Science. In 1959, C.P. Snow lamented that too few intellectuals could describe both the plot of a Shakespeare play and the second law of thermodynamics; ASHA aims to produce more of them.

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New Slate of D2L Workshops for Arts Faculty

Eight new Arts-faculty-only workshops on D2L are now available, this week and next. [UPDATE on 2014-09-11: Workshops are now open to Teaching Assistants, too.] The first is rather short notice, but if you’re new to the system this week then some help can’t come too soon. All are in MB 203B (MacKimmie Block).

Click on a date to register. Each workshop has 20 spaces, so some may already be full.

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#FAOW: Arts Orientation 2014-15

This week the Faculty of Arts held orientation events for its class of 2014-15 incoming students, including a Wednesday-morning presentation and Q-and-A session. Here’s a gallery of images from that morning.

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#FAOW: Arts Orientation Photo Gallery

An Ode to Profhacker

Next week’s the start of a new academic term here at the University of Calgary, when students start to fill the campus’s empty halls and study spaces. The air has a mix of excitement and anxiety — common when people transition into a new environment, whether those people are first-year Arts students or their faculty grappling with our new learning management system.

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Teaching + Learning News 2.01

  • 2014-08-25
  • Quasi-regular reports on higher-education teaching and learning, as seen from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014. Follow me on Twitter, if you do that sort of thing.
  • Feedback and submissions are always welcome. Leave a comment below, or drop me a line.

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D2L Resources for Teaching Assistants

[A message for teaching assistants in the Faculty of Arts. If you’re a faculty member, click here.]

As we approach the Fall term, the Faculty of Arts wants to help you use Desire2Learn: the system that recently replaced Blackboard. It gives instructors the ability to manage courses, email students, collect and grade assignments, run online discussions, track student grades, and more. It’s likely that some component of your TAships will require you to work in this system.

So here are some details on two resources that will help: training, and online resources.

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D2L in the Faculty of Arts: 4 Supports

[A message for teaching faculty in the Faculty of Arts. If you’re a Teaching Assistant, click here.]

As we approach the Fall term, the Faculty of Arts wants to help you use Desire2Learn: the system that has — as you know — replaced Blackboard. It gives you the ability to manage courses, email students, collect and grade assignments, run online discussions, track student grades, and more.

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D2L Coaches’ Corner

2014-09-24 D2L poster

D2L Coaches are one of the four supports available to faculty members in the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts.

Because sometimes, amid all the helplines and job aids, you just need to work with a real live person.

So how and when are the coaches available?

  • From September 2014 to April 2015
  • Make an appointment by calling (403) 220 2000, or e-mailing d2larts@ucalgary.ca
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Workshop on Computational Rhetoric

Here’s the program that Randy Harris of the University of Waterloo has assembled for a workshop later this month on computational rhetoric, where I’ll be presenting on my Zeugmatic project and learning a lot about how great minds at Waterloo are defining rhetorical figures computationally.

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Birds of a Feather @ DHSI2014

41311696_16ef86e2a7_mIf you’re coming to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute June 2-6, we’d like to remind you of the Birds of a Feather sessions happening Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday after classes from 4:15 to 5:15 (see schedule).

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CFP: Renaissance Studies + New Technologies

digitalRSA 2015 | 26-28 March, Berlin | #rsa15

Co-Organizers:
Monique O’Connell, Wake Forest University: Digital Humanities Chair, RSA
Michael Ullyot, University of Calgary: Electronic Media Chair, RSA

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Teaching + Learning News 1.03

  • 2014-05-09
  • Semi-occasional reports on the world of higher-education teaching and learning, as seen from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014. Follow me on Twitter, if you do that sort of thing.
  • Submissions of news stories are always welcome. Leave a comment below, or e-mail me: artsadtl{at}ucalgary{dot}ca.

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Winners of Student Union Teaching Awards

Congratulations to the Faculty of Arts’ seven recipients of Students Union Teaching Excellence Awards and Honourable Mentions. Our faculty got more awards than any other (who’s counting?) — for course instructors in the departments of English, Art, Political Science, Anthropology, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

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D2L Training for the Faculty of Arts

The following is a reminder from Heather Weiland (from University of Calgary I.T.) of the final week of Desire2Learn training sessions designed specifically for the Faculty of Arts.

Remember, Blackboard will be unavailable at the end of this month (May 2014).

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Down with Essays!

This term I gave my students in English 410 (Elizabethan Poetry + Prose) an unconventional assignment. For their final critical papers, they had to make a compelling and effective argument about poetry’s function and purpose, and cite primary evidence from the poets and critics we read this term (Spenser, Sidney, Whitney, et al.)

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Teaching + Learning News 1.02

  • 2014-04-01
  • Semi-occasional reports on the world of higher-education teaching and learning, as seen from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts. By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving your inbox from overload since 2014.

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Winners of the University of Calgary Teaching Awards

Congratulatons to two members of the Faculty of Arts, who have won the first annual University of Calgary Teaching Awards:

  • Dr. Ken MacMillan, Teaching Award for Full-Time Faculty (full professor)
  • Carmen Braden (Music), Teaching Award Award for Graduate Assistants (Teaching)

Faculty of Arts Teaching Awards

The Faculty of Arts Teaching Awards acknowledge teaching excellence as critically important to our faculty; they recognize undergraduate and graduate teaching in the areas of classroom instruction, course design, curriculum development, and innovation in teaching methods. Excellent teachers are individuals who exhibit zest for teaching and instill a love of learning, stimulate critical thinking in their students, create an engaging learning experience, and are innovative and creative in their teaching methods, course design, and curriculum development.

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The D2L Panopticon

In my Elizabethan Poetry and Prose course I’m using Desire2Learn as our learning management system. It looks like this:

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 07.21.17

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Teaching + Learning News 1.01

 

2014-03-11

The first in a series of occasional reports from the world of higher-education teaching and learning, as viewed from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts: faculty development, student engagement, and a vague sense of things to come.

By Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching + Learning): saving you from unnecessary e-mails since 2014.

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Desire2Learn and the Faculty of Arts

d2l_screenshot

On May 31st, Blackboard will be no more, and Desire2Learn (D2L) will take its place.

Desire2Learn is the new platform for online and blended learning at the University of Calgary. It’s a leading-edge and robust learning management system from a Canadian software company, designed to work well on any modern web browser, on any computer or mobile operating system. It’s used by both K-12 school boards in Calgary, by most private schools in the city, and nearly every all post-secondary institution (except MRU).

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#LearningSpaces

The Learning Technologies Task Force (LTTF), a committee of the Provost and Vice-President Academic at the University of Calgary, is nearing completion and will issue its report in a couple of months. Our focus is on learning experiences that are enhanced and enabled by technology.

One of our final steps has been to think creatively about Learning Spaces: real and virtual, on and off campus. How do spaces — classrooms, labs, onscreen interfaces, libraries, studios, study spaces, or wherever else you learn — enable or disable your learning? What are the University of Calgary’s best and worst learning spaces? What kinds of space enhance your learning, and why? If you ran the university, what would they look and feel like?

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Forward Thinking: Interdisciplinary Programs and the Adjacent Possible

[Cross-posted to the Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences blog.]

When I was an undergraduate, the recruiting poster for an interdisciplinary program in the humanities asked, “What do Leonardo da Vinci and Martha Stewart have in common?” The answer: “They’re both generalists.”

Whatever you think of its chosen exemplars, that program is no more. All interdisciplinary programs ebb and flow with intellectual currents, as they should — but their common aim is to imagine future fields of study, emerging from the fields between the disciplinary borders of our imagined present.

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Rethinking Industrial-Era Education in the Information Age

[Cross-posted on the LSE’s Impact of Social Sciences blog, 2014-02-21]

I’m now a third of the way through my first MOOC, or Massive Open Online Course. Received wisdom says that the fact that I’m still enrolled in a MOOC makes me vanishingly rare. But it seems that wisdom is wrong; the completion rates for some MOOCs are near 48%.

And this MOOC’s modus operandi is to reject received wisdom. The History and Future of Higher Education encourages participants (to quote its subtitle) to unlearn the traditional model of higher education, with its roots in the middle ages and its growth in the industrial 19th century. And then to relearn a new model for the information age. In short, it asks if you were designing a university in 2014, what would it look like? How would it work? Would it have labs and lecture theatres, faculties and four-year degrees? Or would it use different systems to reach the same intellectual and economic outcomes?

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Report on Big Data and Digital Scholarship

Capitalizing on Big Data: Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada

I spent today in an Ottawa conference room talking about data management plans for Canada’s digital scholars. It was hosted by the main federal granting agencies (SSHRC, NSERC, CIHR, and the CFI), collectively known as the TC3+. The TC3+ recently reported on the future of research data, including data stewardship and funding guidelines. Today’s conversation was based on that report, and on its 58 responses from universities, organizations, and individual researchers.

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History and Future of Higher Education

Today is the first day of a six-week course I’m taking online, The History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education. Its core question is how we can design educational institutions to be future-ready — that is, ready to think and solve problems in ways that are only possible in 2014 — rather than mindlessly traditionalist.

If you were designing a new university today, would it look like most universities of today?

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WordPress-ing 101

The following are my general instructions to students (mostly in my own courses) posting entries to the WordPress blogs designated for my various courses.

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ENGL410 in January 2014

If you’re a student in my English 410 (Elizabethan Poetry & Prose) class in Winter 2014, here’s what you need to know.

I’m away for the next two weeks, so the first three classes (January 9, 14, and 16) are replaced by these three podcasts of me reading Sir Philip Sidney’s The Defence of Poesy. Listen to them while you read along to the text in this anthology.

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Wintry vistas on University of Calgary campus

Here are some photos from my walk into work this morning.

Digital Arts & Humanities (DAH) Colloquium: Call for Speakers

Editor’s Note: This series was later renamed DASHTalks, for Digital Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities Talks. More information is here.

We invite faculty and graduate students engaged in well-defined or -developed research/creation projects in the digital arts and humanities to propose brief and trenchant 5-minute presentations on these projects, for a colloquium to be held in January 2014 (dates TBD). We will accept as many proposals as will feasibly promote the colloquium’s spirit of cross-fertilization among members of the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts.

Accepted proposals will explain your research and creation methods in engaging and provocative language. In other words, why is your work important, not just to you but also to the faculty, the university, and the community at large? How might it foster collaborations with them? Presentations will be video-recorded, edited, and distributed widely.

Please submit a 100-word bio and 100-word proposal to the co-organizers, Murray McGillivray [ mmcgilli{at}ucalgary.ca ] and Michael Ullyot [ ullyot{at}ucalgary.ca ] by December 27th, 2013.

Facetime in the Flipped Classroom

What are classrooms for? One answer to that question harkens back to the invention of the university in the European middle ages: for lectures (or lectio), or reading texts aloud in an age of scarce manuscripts. The other component of a good medieval education was oral disputation (disputatio), which we’ve mixed with the Socratic method to design discussion forums and oral exams.

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To save higher education, click here

Last month (November 2013) the Faculty of Arts issued a report on “Post-Secondary Education in the Digital Age.” (I was a co-chair.) We gathered information on faculty members’ use of learning technologies, or more specifically, on their

“current e-learning practices, their needs and desires regarding e-learning, any impediments that limited their ability to utilize e-learning in their classes, the means by which the Faculty should support e-learning, and the priorities the Faculty should set for e-learning.”

Finally, we made seven recommendations to foster pedagogical innovations.

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MOOCs: Evolution or revolution?

Today I heard a podcast from Radio National (Australia)’s “Big Ideas” program on the MOOC, or Massive Open Online Course, “an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access.” It gave me the title for this post, and provoked a lot of questions. In sum, its main question was whether this new platform for teaching and learning is going to revolutionize education as we know it, or simply represent the next stage of its evolution. (Whether or not it will go the way of education-by-radio or other past ‘revolutions’ wasn’t one of the options.)

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Launching a conversation

 

Where are all the bloggers in higher-ed administration?

The question sounds strange, maybe because higher-ed administration is veiled in mystery and perceived as mundane. We don’t ask about the blogging actuaries. But maybe that’s why I couldn’t say what interesting questions come up in actuarial science, or just what actuaries do. (Something about pensions, I think.)

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The Sound of Virtue: A Recording of Sidney’s Defence of Poesy

For a few years now (since 2007), I’ve taught an advanced introductory course on Elizabethan poetry. I mean ‘poetry’ in the broadest possible sense, beyond even Sir Philip Sidney’s meaning — of any fictional narrative that teaches and delights, that creates “notable images of virtues, vices, or what else.” I mean ‘poetry’ as all specimens of non-dramatic writing, as my curriculum designers would have it.

Each year, my students have begun the course by reading all of Sidney’s treatise on the meaning and functions of poetry. It’s like Northrop Frye once said about classical mythology, or the Bible (I forget which): when you know these stories well, when they have sunk to the bottom of your consciousness, every story you read thereafter gets layered on top of their landscape of narratives and images.

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Zeugmatic Research Associate, 2014 – ?


The Zeugmatic Project
is recruiting a student to undertake a PhD in English at the University of Calgary, beginning in Fall 2014, with up to three years of financial support from the Project as a Research Associate. The ideal candidate will have an MA or MPhil in Early Modern/Renaissance English language and literature with a demonstrated interest in the digital humanities, but those with other kinds of formation will be also be considered, including very promising students with BA only.

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Call for Submissions: Digital Appropriations of Shakespeare


CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS 
to a new “Digital Appropriations” section of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation (or B&L)

B&L is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal publishing original scholarship on the afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical histories. We publish two issues, online, per year: < http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/ >. In addition to articles and article clusters (groups of two or more related articles with a short introduction by the cluster editor), we regularly publish three dedicated sections: Appropriations in Performance, Notes, and Book Reviews.

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Social-Media Sabbatical

tumblr_m1rbuwwVgO1r028o8o1_500I’m taking a 3-month break from social media from September through November, to finish a book manuscript. That means a hiatus from my Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and Pinterest accounts — and even from this blog. I’ll be back at the beginning of December.

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Whatever Happened to the Fifteenth Century?

This fall I’m offering a graduate seminar on the 15th century: a period of literary history that’s rarely taught, and only known (if at all) for its representations in later history plays. Shakespeare’s interest in the period is partly because of the foreign and civil wars that kings like Henry IV and Henry VI were embroiled in — wars that also explain, to some, why conditions were difficult for good prose and poetry. (Drama’s a very different story: this is the age of Mankind, the mystery plays, and the great biblical cycle of York.)

2013-07-08 10.42.06

What survives is rarely praised, when it’s read at all. Thomas Malory’s great prose romance of King Arthur, Le Morte Darthur (1469-70), is one of the only recognized works of this century. The rest — from ballads to beast fables — are said to be “of a consistent and quite extraordinary dullness.” Douglas Gray disagrees in his 1985 Oxford Book of Late Medieval Verse & Prose, now (revealingly) out of print. He calls it “one of the great ages of English prose, as well as one of the most neglected.”

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Environments and Interfaces

I’m in Victoria, BC this week for two meetings, the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities (part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences) and the Digital Humanities Summer Institute. This morning I attended a panel on the topic of “Digital Humanities Microclimates: Practice and the Politics/Pragmatics of Place.”

This stimulating conversation provoked me to think about the places where DH operates. It’s reinforced my sense that the best space for research oscillates between virtual and real, mediated and unmediated.

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CFP: Renaissance Studies and New Technologies

RSA 2014, 27-29 March; New York, NY
Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) annual meetings have featured panels on new technologies for scholarly research, publishing, and teaching. At the 2014 meeting in New York, we will offer panels on recent research (with 20-minute papers, followed by questions) and workshops on emerging ideas and methodologies (with 10-minute introductions, followed by hands-on demonstrations).

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RSA-TCP Article Prize in Digital Renaissance Research

Screen Shot 2012-03-02 at 9.39.19 AMThe Renaissance Society of America and the Text Creation Partnership (TCP) are jointly offering a prize that seeks to recognize and encourage the scholarly use of the vast range and depth of Renaissance materials made available by digitization.  The purpose of the prize is to recognize and reward original research that makes substantial and significant use of digitized archives of Renaissance print and manuscript source materials, and which engages thoughtfully with these resources.

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Launch of the Zeugmatic

My project for Summer 2013 is to design a text-analysis algorithm capable of recognizing Shakespeare’s rhetorical figures. For instance, this repetition of “farewell” in Othello is called an anaphora:

2013 03 28 12 39 39[1]

That’s a pretty straightforward anaphora, and is just the kind of linguistic feature that a pattern-recognizing algorithm could detect. I could show you more complicated examples, but first let’s imagine the higher-order interpretations that this algorithm would enable.

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Desert Island Reading List

My English 503 students and I are reading Susan Hill’s memoir Howard’s End is on the Landing, which culminates in a list of books she would take to a desert island. Her choices say as much about Hill’s life as her bookshelves — which are really one and the same, as for most lifelong readers.

It got me planning a similar exercise with my students, to ‘crystallize’ (Hill’s word) a lifetime of experience into a single shelf of books you have read, and would happily spend the rest of your life reading.

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English 340 Research Project

Here is the Research Project description for English 340:

340 Research Project by

Scaling Shakespeare

This is the revised text of my MLA 2013 paper. I’m revising & expanding it, in early 2013 — particularly in the ‘next steps’ section at the bottom. For more information on this project, see here.

The right markup on Shakespeare’s texts can help algorithms address other texts in the early modern English language.

The object of my research is early modern language:

  • specifically texts printed before 1700,
  • specifically Shakespeare,
  • specifically his rhetorical figures.

The rhetorical figure I just used is called an anaphora, where the same word is repeated at the beginning of a sequence of clauses or sentences.

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Advice on short-form essays

[I wrote this for students in my English 340 survey course, after their midterm in December 2012.]

Typewriter 01A short essay in an exam is different from other kinds of critical writing, in a few ways. Its main motive is to demonstrate your ability to interpret the text in a brief argument addressing the terms of the question.

I am more concerned with what you say than how you say it. An exam essay is a first draft, so it’s okay to do the things you’d clean up in revision, like using the passive voice or run-on sentences — so long as you follow the rules of grammar.

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English 503: The History of Reading (W2013)

Faculty of Arts  ::  University of Calgary 

Instructor: Dr Michael Ullyot   Office: Social Sciences 1106   Office hours: Wednesdays, 12-1   E-mail: ullyot[at]ucalgary[dot]ca  Google+: my profile   Twitter: @ullyot (i.e. twitter.com/ullyot)   ~ Course blog ~

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English 503: The Twitter Assignment

Using Twitter in English 503 will help me gauge your reactions to the course material, and make my teaching more responsive to your questions and interests. My goal is twofold:

  • To use a social-network platform to build the intellectual network of our class, based on our shared knowledge of the course texts; and to situate that network in the world-wide intellectual network of writers, artists, journalists, critics, and anyone else who reflects on the history and future of reading.
  • To encourage you each to ask questions about the course material, questions that identify “trending topics” (as Twitter calls them) in the class at large. I also want to help you move toward more complex questions by the end of the course: questions that show not merely how much you know, but how well you think as a critic. With time, are you moving from understanding to analyzing, and from analyzing to evaluating? Do you read between the lines, make connections between passages, convey more than one layer of information?
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The PechaKucha

3652703098_c59793479b_oPechaKucha (“puh-CHACH-ka”) is a presentation format that encourages brevity and focus. You make an argument linked to 20 slides, each displayed for 20 seconds — or for 6 minutes and 40 seconds altogether.

In my assignments, I require your slides to be only images: no written language of any kind is allowed. The only words that matter are the ones coming out of your mouth. That means no cartoons, no annotated charts or graphs. Your argument accompanies your images like a voice-over, but one you (typically) deliver live. 

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Job Advertisement: Assistant Professor, Digital Humanities

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

TENURE TRACK

ENGLISH 

[View ad in PDF]

The Department of English at the University of Calgary invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective July 1, 2013.

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Reading the History of Reading

In Winter 2013 I’m teaching an advanced undergraduate seminar in “The History of Reading” (English 503). That definite article — the — is misleading: this isn’t a definitive history of all reading, but rather A History of Reading, as Alberto Manguel called his book on the subject.

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The Writing Contract

tumblr_ltqkrb0wud1qb2b92o1_500[A post for students in my ASHA321 course in Fall 2012. I’m indebted to Ryan Cordell for this idea.]

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The Research Paper

Typewriter 01[A post for students in my ASHA321 course in Fall 2012.]

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The Unessay

propagandism_synergy-05[A post for students in my ASHA321 course in Fall 2012.]

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PechaKucha Classroom Presentations

3652703098_c59793479b_oThis fall (2012) I’m giving student in one of my classes the option to present on texts we’re reading using the PechaKucha format: 20 slides, each displayed for 20 seconds — or 6 minutes and 40 seconds of narration.

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ASHA 321 | Representation | Fall 2012

Arts & Science Honours Academy  ::  Faculty of Arts  ::  University of Calgary
Instructor: Dr Michael Ullyot
Office: Social Sciences 1106
E-mail: ullyot[at]ucalgary[dot]ca
Google+: my profile
Twitter: @ullyot (i.e. twitter.com/ullyot)
Office hours: By appointment (e-mail)

~ Course blog ~

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Links and Visuals

Links are an essential part of an effective post. You’re always working and thinking and writing in tandem with others, no matter what kind of research you’re engaged in. Links just make these connections explicit, and make your thinking more open-source. That means your readers can easily check the sources you’re citing — building on, agreeing or disagreeing with, or whatever. Link to anything and everything that’s influenced your thinking. Here are some categories to consider:

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Blog Posts

This document is an introduction to my guidelines and grading rubrics for writing blog posts and comments (if applicable) in my courses.

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Data Curation in the Networked Humanities

Between now and 2015, I’m working to improve the automated encoding of early modern English texts, to enable text analysis.

In October and November 2012 I delivered two papers to launch Encoding Shakespeare, a project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The first was presented to Daniel Paul O’Donnell‘s Digital Humanities students at the University of Lethbridge (Alberta). The second was delivered to the London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. (For hosting/inviting me, thanks to Willard McCarty, Claire Warwick, and Andrew Prescott; and to Dan O’Donnell.)

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Introduction to Digital Humanities

 

On 22 September 2014 I’ll lead an Introduction to the Digital Humanities seminar to graduate students in English 696 at the University of Calgary.

We’ll cover issues of professionalization and DH research methods, including:

  • Defining DH. Is it really the future of literary studies?
  • The Problem of Big Data / The Solution (?) of Distant Reading
  • Tools for Thought. Are we testing what we know, or our boundaries of knowledge?
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CFP: Renaissance Studies and New Technologies

Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America annual meetings have featured panels on new technologies for scholarly research, publishing, and teaching. At the 2013 meeting (San Diego, 4-6 April 2013), several panels will cover these new and emerging projects and methodologies. We seek proposals in and beyond the following areas:

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Teaching Hamlet in the Humanities Lab

[This is the revised text of a conference paper I gave in a panel on digital humanities teaching at the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) annual meeting in Washington DC on Friday 23 March 2012. Thanks to Diane Jakacki and William R. Bowen for the invitation to attend.]

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O’Donnell talk this Thursday (15 March)

Announcing the fourth of five talks in the MARCS (Medieval and Renaissance Cultural Studies) Speakers’ Series:

Daniel Paul O’Donnell

(Department of English, University of Lethbridge)

“Move Over: Learning to Read (and Write) with Novel Technology” 

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Goodbye, Cruel Word: The Superiority of Scrivener

[Full disclosure: I took this title from Steven Poole‘s blog post of 2007; in 2009 Nick Balaz used the same title.]

These are my notes for a talk in the Faculty of Arts Research Seminar (FARS) series at the University of Calgary on March 14th, 2012. The convenors of FARS are me (Michael Ullyot) and Noreen Humble.

Descriptive Blurb

Scrivener is software (for Mac and Windows) designed especially for long, complex writing projects. Unlike many word processors, it accommodates writing at every stage, from gathering sources to outlining arguments to composing drafts to rearranging segments in a final text. It encourages you to dismember large projects into their constituent parts, to take notes and write sections in isolation or in context. It can compile those sections into an outline or display them as cards on a corkboard for you to stack and rearrange. Put simply, it elevates your words and simplifies your workflow; it is to word processors what fontina is to Velveeta.

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EEBO Tutorial: Books by printer + publisher

I wrote this tutorial, and another, for my English 411 (Seventeenth Century Literature) students to complete their EEBO Assignment, but both may be useful to others. The  instructions assume that you are logging in to Early English Books Online through your institution; mine is the University of Calgary Library.

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English 411: The EEBO Assignment

Introduction

Early English Books Online, or EEBO, “contains digital facsimile[s] … of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700.”  That’s a lot of books — something like 125,000 individual titles and editions.

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EEBO Tutorial: Searching

I wrote this tutorial, and another, for my English 411 (Seventeenth Century Literature) students to complete their EEBO Assignment, but both may be useful to others. The instructions assume that you are logging in to Early English Books Online through your institution; mine is the University of Calgary Library.

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On blogging in the Digital Humanities

[This is a companion post to “On blogging in English 203,” which I wrote for students in — wait for it — my English 203 (Hamlet in the Humanities Lab) seminar.]

Blogging in the social, pure, and applied sciences is a common enough practice that two members of the London School of Economics’ Public Policy Group said today that it is “one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now” — namely, circulating ideas-in-progress to readers in more immediate and (yes) more interesting forms than traditional academic publishing.

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On blogging in English 203

Students in my English 203 (Hamlet in the Humanities Lab) seminar this term will each publish five blog posts in March 2012 (see schedule) to the course blog. These posts, and the comments they will write on each other’s posts, count for 35% of their 50% Team Projects. Add that to the 30% Final Paper they’ll write as much longer posts, and clearly some guidelines and grading rubrics are in order, both for blog posts and for comments.

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Blog posts in English 203

I’ve written expanded guidelines and a detailed rubric both for blog posts and comments on your colleagues’ posts in English 203 (Hamlet in the Humanities Lab). Here they are.

Encoding Exercise Description for English 203

Course home page. }

Introduction

Digital text-analysis relies on a layer of encoded information between the text and the algorithms that analyze it. Encoding is the necessary first step to making the elements of a text show us interesting things.

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Team Project Description for English 203

There are two phases to your Team Project in English 203 (Hamlet in the Humanities Lab), each worth different grades, for a total grade of 50%:
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English 203: The Twitter Assignment

Using twitter in English 203 will help me listen to your reactions to the course material, to make my teaching more responsive to your questions. (As some of you will know, I did this in a larger Shakespeare course last term.) My goal is to encourage you each to ask questions about the course material, questions that will identify “trending topics” (as twitter calls them) in the class at large. I want to help each of you move toward higher-level questions by the end of the course: questions that show not merely how much you know, but how well you think. With time, are you moving from understanding to analyzing, and from analyzing to evaluating? Do you read between the lines, make connections between passages, convey more than one layer of information?

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Resources for First-time Readers of Milton’s *Paradise Lost*

I prepared this list for my English 411 students in Winter 2012, and welcome comments on further suggestions.
  • Mary Fuller’s chronology of events in the poem is helpful for untangling narrative threads.
  • Darkness Visible was prepared by undergraduate students at Christ’s College, Cambridge for the 400th anniversary of the poet’s birthday, in 2008.
  • See here for more materials from that celebration, including podcast lectures by eminent Miltonians: Quentin Skinner, Colin Burrow, Sharon Achinstein,  Geoffrey Hill, and Christopher Ricks.

Representations: of Time

In Fall 2012, I’ll teach a course on “Representations” (ASHA 321) for the University of Calgary’s multidisciplinary Arts and Science Honours Academy. The course description gives me the freedom to provoke thoughts about “issues, inconsistencies and flaws arising from the concept of representation.” Because the students are in both science and arts programs, I’m interested in texts that speak to a range of fields.

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205 Final Exam

Here is a PDF of the English 205 Final Exam as it will appear next week. Important differences between this document and the actual exam are in red type.

A3 Model Answers

In Fall 2010, A3 had the same instructions, but was about a different text (As You Like It). Its three essay questions are below, followed by links to answers by three students who got very good marks on the assignment, and agreed to let their work serve as models.

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English 205: Assignment 3 (10%)

Due date: Thursday, December 8th, 2011 (in tutorial)

Instructions

Choose one of three essay questions, below, on Cymbeline.

Then write one complete paragraph as an introduction, which clearly describes your argument and your methods, and culminates in an underlined thesis statement. (This is the only paragraph you will write.)

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English 205: Assignment 2 (7.5%)

Due date: Thursday 17 November, in tutorial

Your response must begin with an underlined thesis statement (a sentence stating your argument in clear, direct, and precise language). Remember, a valid argument can have a counter-argument.

Listen to these three radio adaptations of Hamlet 2.2 (pages 38-55):

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Terms for Close Reading

Here is a list of terms for close reading Shakespeare’s texts, with examples — mostly from As You Like It. I developed it with my RA Sarah Hertz, specifically for Exercise 2 in English 205 (Fall 2011). But it may come in handy for anyone doing close readings of early modern drama.

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English 205 materials posted

I’ve now posted all of my Fall 2011 section of English 205 (Foundations: Shakespeare) course materials.

You can start with the course home page, the course schedule [PDF], or with the blog posts on different components like the Twitter assignment, the in-class, exercises, the final exam, and so on.

There’s also a PDF document of the nine big ideas that will inform the course.

English 205: Assignments (25%)

The course has three (3) assignments that you will write at home, to develop and demonstrate your skills more independently. Each will be discussed in lectures and tutorials, and each of their due dates is listed in the course schedule (A1, A2, A3). See my Submission Policy for the penalties for late submissions. If you miss any assignment, for any reason, there is no make-up exercise.

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English 205: Exercises (25%)

The course includes five (5) tutorial exercises to apply and practice the critical reading and writing skills you learn about in particular weeks. You will complete these exercises in five different tutorials, as noted in the course schedule (E1, E2, E3, E4, E5). In lectures, I will discuss each of these skills in detail. Your TA and I will teach you how to complete each exercise successfully. Only E4 and E5 are open-book. You must complete and submit each exercise in the time allowed. If you miss any exercise, for any reason, there is no make-up exercise.

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English 205: The Final Exam (25%)

The final exam will be two hours long; it will be scheduled by the Registrar. Students must be available for examinations up to the last day of the examination period.

The exam will test your ability to apply the techniques of writing and criticism that we have developed throughout the course to As You Like It, Hamlet, Cymbeline and the critical readings {C} we have done.

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Academic Integrity

Using any source whatsoever without clearly documenting it is a serious academic offence. If you submit an assignment that includes material (even a very small amount) that you did not write, but that is presented as your own work, you are guilty of plagiarism. The consequences include failure on the assignment or in the course, and suspension or expulsion from the university. For details, see here.

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My Course Policies

Submission Policy

Make every effort to submit your typed, printed assignments directly to me or (if applicable) to your TA, in class. If that is impossible, take your paper to the Department office (SS1152) and put it in the drop-box, where your paper will be date-stamped and placed in my mailbox. Always keep a copy in case of loss. Electronic submissions will not be accepted. Papers will not be returned by office staff.

Writing assignments must be submitted no later than one calendar week after the due date. Each student is permitted only one extension, on any one assignment, of one day without penalty. (Your first late submission is your one free extension: no exceptions.) Beyond that, I penalize late assignments””submitted after class ends on the due date””at a rate of 5% daily, excluding weekends and university holidays, to a maximum of 25%. After that, you will receive a zero grade on that assignment.

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Resources

Prof. Ullyot’s guide to Effective Critical Writing
My guide to effective critical writing includes advice on drafting and revising, managing your time, citing secondary sources, and avoiding plagiarism.

A Student’s Guide to the Presentation of Essays
The English Department’s guide to essay presentation.

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English 205: The Twitter Assignment

Using twitter in English 205 will help me listen to your reactions to the course material, to make my teaching more responsive to your questions. My goal is to encourage you each to ask questions about Shakespeare, questions that will identify “trending topics” (as twitter calls them) in the class at large. I want to help each of you move toward higher-level questions by the end of the course: questions that show not merely how much you know, but how well you think. With time, are you moving from understanding to analyzing, and from analyzing to evaluating? Do you read between the lines, make connections between passages, convey more than one layer of information?

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A Rubric for Close Reading

With my research assistant Sarah Hertz, I’m developing a rubric for close readings of Shakespeare’s texts, mostly verse, in my English 205 this fall (2011). Close reading is a core skill for English majors, and thus is one of the skills the course focuses on. (The others are slow reading; annotating texts; using evidence; paraphrasing and comparing passages; and the stages of critical writing–from citations to arguments to outlines to editing.)

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Foundations: Shakespeare | English 205, Fall 2011

Department of English  ::  Faculty of Arts  ::  University of Calgary

This is the home page of English 205 in Fall 2011. I have also written a series of blog posts on various aspects of the course design.

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Listening with Twitter


On Day 1 of a course, after I’ve given students essential information like my office hours and how to pronounce my name, I ask about their prior knowledge of the subject. In my introduction to Shakespeare, for instance, I ask which of his plays they read in high school, which they’ve seen in performance, and if they have a favourite (and why).  And I ask what students hope to get out of the course, beyond fulfilling a requirement.

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Data Visualization

Description

How does the visualization of data enable digital humanists to understand texts, develop questions, and report the results of our research? Can we visualize only quantitative data (e.g. word clouds based on frequency or proximity)? How do we convert qualitative questions — like a given character’s preoccupation with death — into quantitative images?

These are a few preliminary questions as I develop a resource list for students in my English 203 in Winter 2012, Hamlet in the Humanities Lab.

Tools

Shakespeare Visualizations

Hamlet in the Humanities Lab | English 203, Winter 2012

Department of English  ::  Faculty of Arts  ::  University of Calgary

This is the home page of English 203 in Winter 2012. I have also written a series of blog posts on various aspects of the course design. The full course outline is also available in Google Docs.

Here is the English 203 blog, where students and I post materials and lab reports on using five different text-analysis tools.

Instructor: Dr Michael Ullyot

Office: Social Sciences 1106

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Effective Critical Writing

Introduction

Critical thinking delves beneath the surface of things, turning them into objects for study, interpretation, and judgement. The aim of critical writing is to express these thoughts.

Effective critical writing offers a rigorous and thorough argument composed in clear, concise, and natural language that obeys the rules of grammar.

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Teaching materials

Course syllabi, teaching resources, and other materials related to my teaching:

2013-14

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Methodical methodologies

Doug Knox’s comment on my post about Encoding and Interpretation sent me to Stephen Ramsay’s paper “The Meandering through Textuality Challenge” (MLA, 2011).

Ramsay investigates the “digging into data” metaphor — widely used in the DH community because of its formalized support and recognition across multiple funding bodies. But this metaphor suffers (Ramsay writes) from what Neal Stephenson calls “metaphor shear“: essentially, we take it too literally.

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Encoding (and) Interpretation

Is encoding text an act of literary interpretation, or of pattern recognition? Either way, is it quantifiable? And if so, can a computer do it as readily as a human reader?

Those are just a few of my questions after a week-long course in text encoding at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute 2011, with the wonderful Julia Flanders from the Brown University Women Writers Project, Doug Knox from the Newberry Library, and Melanie Chernyk from the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria. We learned how to encode texts in TEI. That means taking texts that look like this –

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Groupthink, multitasking, & other issues

Having decided to teach Shakespeare with Twitter this fall, I’ve been thinking about a few issues. If others occur to you, gentle reader, I’d be grateful for your solutions in the comments below.

Groupthink. Jonah Lehrer recently wrote about groupthink overshadowing–skewing–the wisdom of crowds. In sum, when you consult a group of people as individual thinkers, their aggregate response is remarkably close to the truth. But when they can see each other’s responses, there’s a reversion to the mean: “um, what she said.” Particularly when the question is vexing, or seems to have a right-or-wrong answer.

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Teaching Shakespeare with Twitter

So it’s official, now: I’m teaching with Twitter in my English 205 (Shakespeare) course this fall.

How? By requiring all students to submit questions that the reading material provokes in them, after they’re finished reading a text. I’m explicitly not encouraging multi-tasking, or tweeting while reading; on the contrary, I underscore the benefits of solitude, of focus, of (as Milton put it) “the quiet and still air of delightful studies.”

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Digital Humanities @ RSA 2012

The results are in; RSA 2012 will have four papers in SHARP-sponsored panels on digital research in early modern books. This is from the original CFP:

What are digital humanists doing now with early modern books and manuscripts? Ann M Blair recently argued that medieval and early modern systems of “managing textual information in an era of exploding publications” are precedents for modern information management systems. Do early reference books, annotations and compilations inform, anticipate, or otherwise influence our computer-assisted thinking?

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Managing student questions

I’m going to try two online systems for managing student questions, on anything related to the course.

The first is Google Moderator, which I’d not heard of before I read a New York Times story today. In theory, this tool “lets a class type questions and vote for the ones they would most like answered.” I’m interested to see how it works in practice. Here’s the link.

The second is Quora, a sort of social network for questions and answers. Here’s the link to the Fall 2011 English 205 topic I started. Note that it uses the same code (F2011 ENGL205) as this blog, which I borrowed from Blackboard.

Hamlet in the Humanities Lab

This post has been converted to a permanent page, so that I can nest contents related to the course there.

My Teaching Philosophy

I. Critics and Curators

I think humanities professors embody two roles. As critics, we encourage students to delve beneath the surfaces of past and present cultures. As curators, we promote their receptivity to and judgement of cultural (intellectual and literary) history. By studying continuities between modern experience and Descartes’s “foreign country” of the past, the humanities teach us about similarities between human experiences that are superficially distinct. Their teachers need to be both critics and curators, choosing and arranging beautiful and important things for public view, while offering and engaging responses to those works.

A few years ago in London’s National Gallery, I was using an audio guide to listen to art historians discuss the pictures I liked–J. M. W. Turner’s play of light, or Henri Rousseau’s dark undertones–when I came across Caspar David Friedrich’s pallid-looking “Winter Landscape” (1811). I was about to pass it by, but I compulsively dialed up the audio commentary. What I heard gave me a strong understanding of its imagery and meaning: here was a glimmer of hope in a grey and Gothic world. I didn’t like the picture any better, but I liked what it meant. Similarly, I hope that students in my classes learn how works inspire legitimate reactions of delight or distaste, and how our initial senses change as our apprehension grows deeper.

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Plans for this site

In the next few months (Summer 2011) I’ll begin repurposing this site to post teaching and research materials. That means my Twitter feed is no longer posted to the blog; that was a fine way to supply posts for the past few months (since last fall), but it will just clutter things up in the future.

My immediate plan is to launch a new collection of posts for materials related to English 205 (Foundations: Shakespeare) in Fall 2011. The posts will replace all the elements of a traditional course syllabus.

Michael Who?

Screen Shot 2013-01-24 at 12.39.20Ullyot. (“UH-lee-yit.”) I’m an Associate Professor of English at the University of Calgary. I’m also the Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) in the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Arts.

My specialties are early modern literature and the digital humanities. I received a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 2005, and an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge in 2000.

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