badges

‘Earn your Shakespeare badge’ video

The Design for Learning 2015 conference has posted the video of our workshop, along with others.

Here’s the complete series of posts on this project.

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Digital Badges for Professional Development

A continuing series from the University of Calgary’s “Design for Learning” conference on university learning and teaching this week (#ticonf2015 on Twitter). I’m live-blogging my notes, so forgive my typos and omissions.

This morning I’m in a session on Micro-Credentialing and Badges, offered by the Educational Development Unit team: Lin Yu, Patti Dyjur, Kevin Saito (who designed the amazing conference app), and Joni Miltenburg. It has clear links to the project my team and I presented yesterday, on our digital badge system in English 205 (Foundations: Shakespeare).

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Netting Participation (Part II)

A guest post by Theresa Kenney on gamification in #engl205. This post is one of three from Theresa’s mini-series about designing and delivering badges

 

As previously posted, our award-system of #engl205 had four main gears that allowed for our award-system to work:

  1. The Course Outline and its Learning Outcomes
  2. The creation of the Badges and recommended activities
  3. Creating and maintaining nets for capturing activity
  4. Record keeping

This post will cover the latter gears to describe the nitty-gritty of fishing for student participation, checking what was in the netting, and awarding students.


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Gearing Gamificiation (Part I)

A guest post by Theresa Kenney on gamification in #engl205. This post is one of three from Theresa’s mini-series about designing and delivering badges

 

To award 88 students approximately 5 Badges each takes a functioning system – with easily accessible online platforms to award and display participation and awards. In practice, there were four main gears that allowed for our award-system to work:

  1. The Course Outline and its Learning Outcomes
  2. The creation of the Badges
  3. Creating and maintaining nets for capturing activity
  4. Record keeping

These four gears (which had a few stalling moments) worked together to offer a system to gamify #engl205, while creating a community of scholars that produced lively criticism. This post will cover the first two gears and its follow up of the latter gears in Part II can be found here.

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Content Providers and Consumers

“Oh Lord!” laments a party host amid her bored guests, in a 1995 New Yorker cartoon, “We forgot to invite any content providers.”

The punchline is dated, twenty years later, if only by her choice of words. In those early days of the internet, ‘content providers’ referred to those who wrote the texts that others read online, which was then still a novel way to distribute texts.

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Ideas in Practice

A guest post by Theresa Kenney on gamification in #engl205. This post is an introduction to Theresa’s mini-series about designing and delivering badges

 

It’s one thing to brainstorm ideas and another to put them to work. After scribbling down inconclusive ideas based on research reports about gamification in Higher Ed, Michael and I were compelled to join the ‘Gamification in Higher Ed’ club. We wanted to present a ‘tangible’ award system to students for #engl205. But how?

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The play’s the thing

“Playing in the digital age” was the subject of a recent podcast on Australian public radio’s “Future Tense” program (which I highly recommend). This wasn’t another story about video games and their cognitive effects, but about ‘play’ in more broad terms: the freedom to innovate and take unpredictable actions within a rule-bound system, whether it’s snooker or sonneteering. You can do novel and unexpected things with others within the alternate space of a game, outside of ordinary life.

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Shakespeare Badges: How and Why?

Third post in a series on the design & delivery of my intro-Shakespeare course this term. 

I’ve written speculatively about implementing a badge system into my intro-Shakespeare course, English 205 this coming term. Now it’s time to get down to brass tacks.

With the start of term right around the corner, Team 205 (my research assistants Theresa and Braydon and I) are working hard to answer two questions:

  1. how will the system work, and
  2. what incentive will students have to use it?
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Earning your Shakespeare badge

Second post in a series on the design & delivery of my intro-Shakespeare course next term. 

When you complete a degree, you earn a diploma. When you complete a course, you earn a grade on your transcript. Should this system of credentials translate to a more granular level, to particular goals within a course?

Imagine you meet a goal in my intro-to-Shakespeare course, say by publishing a couple of blog posts on the historical context or source-texts of Twelfth Night. Call it the “Context” badge. You’ve shown that you can read texts in relation to other texts – a skill that you can then transport to your next class, whether it be in History or English or Sociology or another discipline altogether.

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